Where Trump was right and where he was wrong on the ‘pandemic’ response


Where Trump was right:

* Banned China travel.
* Mention of hydroxychloroquine and alternative treatments.
* Naming the Wuhan lab as a source of the virus and calling it the “China virus.”
* Advocated ending lockdown after a few months.

Where Trump was wrong:

* Listening to Fauci.
* Supporting the lockdown for a few months.
* Supporting the experimental mRNA injections.
* Not following Sweden’s lead.


The primary purpose of this post is to go over Trump’s list in a recent email because it relates to the topic of medical tyranny. With typical bravado, he lists where he was right and the MSM wrong. I have appended brief comments to each claim.

Below that, I have also appended an essay in defense of his presidency, which is an extended opinion piece, followed by a re-post of an essay on the same by Victor Davis Hanson.
_______________________

Trump: “Friend, Have you noticed that the Radical Left is now admitting I was right about everything they LIED about before the Election? Hydroxychloroquine works.”

My commentary: True: he put it forward as a possible treatment and the MSM/social media sites claimed otherwise and started censoring those who even mentioned it.

In the end, he was proved correct, after the MSM played a role in killing people by denying them access to this remedy — all the while falsely claiming that Trump was the murderer.

Trump: “The China Virus came from a Chinese lab.

My commentary: True. The MSM and social media sites censored this fact until it could no longer be denied.

Trump was right to blame China for Covid-19, but what he did not add is that it wasn’t an accident. It was a deliberate act of war against the world.

Trump: “Lafayette Square was not cleared for a photo op.

My commentary: True. Not important now, except to show how deceitful the MSM was. At the time, I thought it was great that he walked to a historic church and held up a Bible (symbolically) after Antifa tried to burn it down.


Trump: “The “Russian Bounties” story was fake.

My commentary: The MSM focused on an alleged “Russian collusion” for four years but this was not only untrue, but as it turned out, was a cover-up for real collusion between the deep state, MSM, and the Chinese Communist Party — which unfortunately is all too real. They apparently follow Saul Alinsky’s dictum to always accuse the enemy of what you yourself are doing.

Trump: “We did produce vaccines before the end of 2020, in record time I might add.”

My commentary: Again, this was a mistake. What Trump should have done is said no to the lockdowns, categorically. He should have kept the country open (like Sweden) to develop natural immunity.

And he should not have supported the development of the toxic mRNA injections. He greatly erred by listening to Fauci.

Trump: “Blue state lockdowns didn’t work.

My commentary: True. No lockdowns worked anywhere they were tried. They were a complete disaster, and did far more harm than good, as this study demonstrates, and as the Great Barrington Declaration stated.

Trump: “Schools should be opened. Critical Race Theory is a disaster for our schools and our Country.”

My commentary: True, except that now public schools are a mess, what with mask mandates, and Critical Race Theory, promotion of the sexualization of children, and transgender indoctrination. The people running them are cultural Marxists.

Homeschooling is the best option.

Trump: “Our Southern Border security program was successful.

My commentary: True, as compared to what’s happening now, which is a disaster along the southern border, with millions pouring in.

This is not good for the U.S.: a country has a right to protect its borders and a say in whom it lets in and keeps out.

Globalists love mass migration, but it’s a disaster in Western Europe and should not be happening in the West anywhere because it will mean the end of the West, ultimately. The West is worth preserving.

Trump concludes his email: “The media and their Democrat partners spent YEARS lying about me to the American People and it turns out I was RIGHT all along. I’ve received NO apologies, NO retractions, nothing.”

My commentary: True. They lied shamelessly for years about him and were demonstrably wrong on numerous issues.


Further thoughts on Trump’s meaning and legacy


Trump, though an imperfect vessel, was a voice for the roughly 100 million so-called ‘deplorables’ in fly-by states, the forgotten ‘rust belt’. They are patriotic, faithful, family-oriented, traditional hard-working Americans – and they were betrayed.

They were betrayed by corrupt globalist elitists who now run the country. See this excellent short documentary on this topic: “Deplorables: Trump, Brexit and the Demonised Masses”

A lot of the so-called Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS) was classism masquerading as moral superiority, as Larry Elder points this out in this rather funny video:


Trump was a symbol of freedom worldwide. In Iran and Hong Kong, pro-democracy activists held his photo aloft at protests.

Demonstrations in Hong Kong continued over the weekend with pro-democracy
protesters waving American flags and wearing Trump 2020 gear.


Trump has an important legacy that will stand the test of time: exposing the MSM and the corruption of the ‘deep state’ (e.g., NSA, FBI). And he is the first President in decades to stand up to China. He flushed them out into plain view.

The MSM as clowns


From 2017 to 2020 I was a supporter of Donald Trump’s presidency, mainly because he seemed to be the loyal opposition to the rise of corporate Communism in the West. He reformed the Republican party for the better.

Prior to Trump, the GOP was run by RINOs (Republican in Name Only) who with a few exceptions seemed uninterested in the culture raging in the U.S. They had been a great disappointment to conservative voters.

Republicans are supposed to stand for faith, family, and nation. Instead, many of them served corporate interests and they ignored the interests of their constituents. They were silent when Leftists went on the attack. But silence wasn’t working.

Trump spoke up. He defended the ordinary working-class American against traitorous elitists who wanted the U.S. to be more like China and who looked down on the silent majority.

I didn’t agree with Trump on everything. Certainly not on the environment or his support for so-called ‘vaccines’ — but he was good on job creation, on Israel, and standing up to China and the ‘woke’ Left, and protecting freedom of religion.

Trump versus the deep state (corruption in government)

And he was funny. The Democrats took themselves far too seriously and needed to be laughed at. I enjoyed his irreverent take-downs of the MSM. Unlike the RINOs, he wasn’t afraid of them.

Plus, I didn’t appreciate their dishonest non-stop scapegoating of him. Almost none of what they criticized him for had substance. It was an obvious web of lies, e.g. “kids in cages“, alleged racism, etc.

Yes, he was crude and vulgar, even narcissistic, but I didn’t care about that. We all have our faults. His were shields against the great downfall of Western man: being afraid of what others think of him.

For example, the Rotheram UK ‘grooming gang’ rapes went on for years under the noses of police because they were afraid to be called racists for arresting them. Trump’s demeanor is a kind of shield he uses to deflect their endless ad hominem attacks while other politicians fall.

In summary, Trump did many good things that were needed at the time, and he was a symbol of freedom, globally … But after he supported Fauci’s demands — including lockdowns and the mRNA injections — I have to admit he lost my support.

I also realized, sometime in 2020, when the Democrat-supported riots were going on, that he’d been a foil for the Left, as Trotsky was for Stalin. He didn’t have the resources to contest the psyop they were engaged in.

Trump became an excuse for Democrats to impose real tyranny: by falsely claiming he was a tyrant, they felt that gave them the license to impose actual tyranny. The Biden vax mandates is an example. They used manufactured hatred of him to grab power.

What’s the history behind all this? In 1995, Bill Clinton brought in NAFTA (free trade) which eviscerated American jobs, in favour of China. The Chinese economy boomed and over time the American economy suffered.

This was also due to increasing automation, displacing workers. Neither major American political party was defending the economic interests of the American working class. They were selling out to corporations.

At the same time, globalists were imposing mass migration and cultural Marxism (now called wokeism), further alienating Americans. The vote for Trump was a response to that, one that the globalists didn’t anticipate in 2016.

Trudeau also puts China first, Canada last.


The MSM was then told by the higher-ups — who include the CCP — that they had to get rid of Trump, through a sustained propaganda campaign, to scapegoat him. This divided the country further. It didn’t manage to unseat him, so in 2019 the CCP decided to unleash the Wuhan virus.

Their plan, I believe, was to kill a lot of Americans and blame it on Trump. The plan worked. It diminished the vote for Trump just enough to split it down the middle, allowing the Democrats to steal the election in swing states – which they did.

Leading up to that, the lockdowns and riots helped to destabilize the country – which was also part of the plan to destroy the U.S. and replace it with a government more along the lines of Communist China. It all went according to plan. Now the U.S. is severely weakened from within.

Then the Democrats, the CCP, and MSM stole the election (there is proof in the Arizona audit), but before that, they’d already imposed a shadow government run by oligarchs and the CCP.

I don’t think Trump helped them deliberately, but it happened just the same. He became like the Goldstein character in Orwell’s 1984, the target of the “two minutes of hate.”

Then Trump helped them inadvertently by going along with the lockdowns and ‘vaccines.’ That was a mistake. Ron DeSantis of Florida has stood up to medical tyranny in his state and is thus a better candidate for president for that reason, in my opinion. However, Trump appears to be the main nominee for 2024 right now.

Trump in the Whitehouse with evangelical Christians who are praying over him
Trump is often compared to King Cyrus of Persia, who although not being Jewish
nevertheless saved the Jews and was thus an instrument of God

Victor Davis Hanson wrote one of the best analyses of Trump, calling him a tragic hero in the ancient Greek tradition — one who did something that had to be done but is unpopular for that reason.

Victor Davis Hanson: From Greek Tragedy To American Therapy

by Victor Davis Hanson, 10/06/2016

The Greeks gave us tragedy — the idea that life is never fair. Terrible stuff for no reason tragically falls on good people. Life’s choices are sometimes only between the bad and the far worse.

In the plays of the ancient dramatists Aeschylus and Sophocles, heroism and nobility only arise out of tragedies.

The tragic hero refuses to blame the gods for his terrible fate. Instead, a Prometheus, Ajax, or Oedipus prefers to fight against the odds. He thereby establishes a code of honor, even as defeat looms.

In contrast, modern Americans gave the world therapy.

Life must always be fair. If not, something or someone must be blamed. All good people deserve only a good life — or else.

A nation of victims soon becomes collectively paralyzed in fear of offending someone. Pay down the $20 trillion debt? Reform the unsustainable Social Security system? Ask the 47% of the population that pays no income tax to at least pay some?

Nope. Victims would allege that such belt-tightening is unfair and impossible — and hurtful to boot. So we do nothing as the rendezvous with financial collapse gets ever closer.

Does anyone think a culture of whiners can really build high-speed rail in California? Even its supporters want the noisy tracks built somewhere away from their homes.

Even animals get in on the new victimhood. To build a reservoir in drought-stricken California means oppressing the valley elderberry longhorn beetle or ignoring the feelings of the foothill yellow-legged frog.

America’s impoverished ancestors at 15 years of age may have rounded Cape Horn on a schooner or ridden bareback over the Rockies.

Not today’s therapeutic college youth. They have been so victimized by racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamophobia and other -isms and -phobias that colleges often provide them “safe spaces,” outlaw “microaggressions” and demand “trigger warnings” to avoid the un-nice.

What would our grandfathers think?

As teenagers on D-Day, they found no safe spaces on Omaha Beach. A storm of steel from thousands of SS killers proved more than a “microaggression” at the Battle of the Bulge. Generals did not give their freezing GIs mere “trigger warnings” about a half-million Chinese Red Army soldiers crossing the Yalu River during the Korean War.

American victimhood is the luxury of an affluent, secure and leisured postmodern society that can afford such silly indulgences.

Second-string San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick apparently assumes that his wealthy team can afford to pay him nearly $20 million a year to sit on the bench, without much caring that he can’t be bothered to stand up for the National Anthem.

But victimhood is a good career move. Kaepernick went from being a washed-up quarterback to being a much-publicized social justice warrior — a veritable Noam Chomsky in cleats opining on over two centuries of American criminal justice.

He was once fined for reportedly smearing a fellow NFL player with the N-word, but now as a victim himself, Kaepernick can no longer be a victimizer.

During the first presidential debate, Hillary Clinton blamed Donald Trump for body-shaming 1996 Miss Universe Alicia Machado two decades ago. Machado had reportedly gained more than 40 pounds and apparently made it hard for Trump’s beauty pageant to showcase her figure in promotional events.

America may be broke and plagued by riots and terrorism. No matter: It apparently can afford to fret over Machado’s 20 years of post-traumatic stress.

Once victimhood is established, we lose our identities and, as part of an offended collective, claim blanket exemption for all our imperfections.

In Machado’s case, what does it matter if such a victim allegedly threatened a Venezuelan judge, or was reportedly involved with a drug cartel leader, or became a campaign shill for the Clinton campaign?

All of that is nothing compared with the trauma of being called fat for not being able to fit back into the bikini that won her the Miss Universe crown and fame.

Sometimes the art of victimhood gets confusing. If we are all victims of some sort, who are left to be the victimizers?

Can victims victimize? Can gays be Islamophobic, Muslims homophobic, blacks racist, women sexist or Latinos xenophobic? If so, who is to sort out their relative rock/paper/scissors zero-sum grievances?

Unfortunately, Russian President Vladimir Putin, the Islamic State and the Chinese have no particular sympathy for any American who lays claim to victim status.

Nor do foreign buyers of U.S. Treasury bonds to finance the debt defer to America’s legions of victims. A nuclear bomb from North Korea or Iran will not sort us all out by race, class or gender, much less by victim and victimizer.

To appreciate American heroism, we might read Sophocles’ “Antigone” or E.B. Sledge’s “With the Old Breed” — and watch a lot less Sunday football.

Hanson is a classicist and historian at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and the author, most recently, of “The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern.”

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Ungekrzte

"Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed immaturity ... the inability to use one's own understanding without another's guidance. This immaturity is self-imposed if its cause lies not in lack of understanding but in indecision and lack of courage to use one's own mind without another's guidance. Dare to know! (Sapere aude.) "Have the courage to use your own understanding," is therefore the motto of the [European] Enlightenment. "Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why such a large part of mankind gladly remain minors all their lives, long after nature has freed them from external guidance. They are the reasons why it is so easy for others to set themselves up as guardians. It is so comfortable to be a minor. If I have a book that thinks for me, a pastor who acts as my conscience, a physician who prescribes my diet [or vaccine], and so on--then I have no need to exert myself. I have no need to think, if only I can pay; others will take care of that disagreeable business for me. Those guardians who have kindly taken supervision upon themselves see to it that the overwhelming majority of mankind ... should consider the step to maturity, not only as hard, but as extremely dangerous. First, these guardians make their domestic cattle stupid and carefully prevent the docile creatures from taking a single step without the leading-strings to which they have fastened them. Then they show them the danger that would threaten them if they should try to walk by themselves. Now this danger is really not very great; after stumbling a few times they would, at last, learn to walk. However, examples of such failures intimidate and generally discourage all further attempts. "Thus it is very difficult for the individual to work himself out of the immaturity which has become almost second nature to him. He has even grown to like it, and is at first really incapable of using his own understanding because he has never been permitted to try it. Dogmas and formulas [e.g., Leftist ideology, identity politics] these mechanical tools designed for reasonable use--or rather abuse--of his natural gifts, are the fetters of an everlasting immaturity. The man who casts them off would make an uncertain leap over the narrowest ditch, because he is not used to such free movement. That is why there are only a few men who walk firmly, and who have emerged from immaturity by cultivating their own minds." - Kant, "An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment"

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